• Belasco Theater

    111 W 44th St, New York, NY – – David Belasco opened the Stuyvesant in October 1907, having already bequeathed his name on his 42nd St playhouse, now the New Victory. When he relinquished the 42nd St theatre in 1910, he immediately renamed the Stuyvesant as the Belasco. He provided himself with a duplex apartment above the theatre that had the décor of a Gothic church, and housed much of his theatrical memorabilia. Following his death, the theatre was rumored to be haunted by his ghost, until it was banished by the risqué production, Oh Calcutta!. The theatre came under Shubert ownership in 1948. Belasco conceived the auditorium of the Belasco…

  • The Shubert Theatre

    225 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036 – – The Shubert’s facade is made of brick and terracotta, with sgraffito decorations designed in stucco. Three arches face south onto 44th Street, and a curved corner faces east toward Broadway. To the east, the Shubert Alley facade includes doors to the lobby and the stage house. The auditorium contains an orchestra level, two balconies, and a flat ceiling. The space is decorated with mythological murals throughout. Near the front of the auditorium, flanking the elliptical proscenium arch, are box seats at balcony level. The upper levels contain offices formerly occupied by the Shubert brothers, and the stage house to the north is shared with the Booth Theatre. The Shubert is part of the largest…

  • Lyric Theatre

    214 West 43rd Street; Manhattan, New York City; United State – – The original Lyric, managed by the Shubert Brothers, opened on October 12, 1903 with Old Heidelberg starring Richard Mansfield. Most of its successes were musical. Two major composers of operetta had hits there: Oscar Straus, whose most famous show, The Chocolate Soldier (based on Shaw’s Arms and the Man), opened at the Lyric in 1909 to run for 296 performances, and Rudolf Friml, whose first show, The Firefly, opened at the Lyric in 1912. Friml’s last hit, The Three Musketeers, produced by the fabled Florenz Ziegfeld, played there for seven months in 1928 (an impressive run in those days). The glory years of the Lyric,…

  • Winter Garden Theatre

    1634 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10019 – – Shubert has owned the Winter Garden Theatre longer than any of its other venues. The playhouse occupies the second American Horse Exchange, built by William K. Vanderbilt in 1896, when Longacre (now Times Square) was the center of the horse and carriage trade. By 1911, when the Shuberts leased the Exchange, horses had given way to the automobile and legitimate stage was making inroads north of 42nd St. The Winter Garden was converted into a theatre in 1911, and had brief interludes as a movie house from 1928 to 1933 when Warner Brothers leased it, and again in 1945, when United Artists…